Recursio

recursio-composite
recursio-01
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recursio-03
recursio-04
recursio-07
recursio-12
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recursio-19

Composite Installation View
2014
wax and pigment on paper
each 8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

Recursio
2014
wax and pigment on paper
8 in x 8 in

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recursio-01 thumbnail
recursio-02 thumbnail
recursio-03 thumbnail
recursio-04 thumbnail
recursio-07 thumbnail
recursio-12 thumbnail
recursio-13 thumbnail
recursio-14 thumbnail
recursio-16 thumbnail
recursio-18 thumbnail
recursio-19 thumbnail

This series is a response to the portrait of a virus as elements of visual design.

When the Ebola epidemic in West Africa became world news in 2014, the killer virus made media appearances as a loopy filament set in complementary colors against a nondescript background.

Ebola is a microscopic particle composed of DNA and invisible to the naked eye. Like all viruses, Ebola does not belong to the Kingdom of Life because it cannot autonomously reproduce itself. Instead, its chemical mechanisms fool a host cell into replicating its DNA. The electron transmission micrograph attaches a face to this otherwise invisible virus, enabling its image to proliferate in our visual media, and to become an icon for the human suffering Ebola imposes upon its host and its threat to human life.

These images are not replicas of that icon. They borrow the looping form of the virus, which threads itself through a circular frame, transgressing the circle’s boundaries at times, confined at others, intersecting warnings with inversions, reversals, and transgressions. Like corporate logos that short-circuit your conscious decision to commit a brand to memory, or street signs that alert you to hazards, these images demand attention from your eyes.

In many traditions, the world was created by speaking it into existence. In the world we inhabit today, the image attaches itself first and then inserts the word.

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